What"s the past participle form of the word exit? Is it exit (irregular, like set)? exited? exitted? On one page I found exited but if that"s the case why isn"t it exitted (double t) like with the word emit - emitted? Is there a rule when the consonant at the end is doubled and when not?




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When we have a word ending in a single vowel and then the consonant "t", the consonant is only doubled before suffixes if that syllable is stressed. So when there is no stress we observe just a single "t". In the following examples the stressed syllables are premarked with an apostrophe:

"rocketede"licited"billeted"ratcheted"exited

However if the last syllable is stressed then we will see a doubling of the consonant:

ga"rotted"vettedre"potteda"bettede"mitted

This is just a rule of thumb as there are special rules for certain prefixes, and compound words and loan words from other languages will not necessarily follow the rule.

Edit: Please also see Janus" interesting comment below about loan words with silent "t"s below!


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